Ann Radcliffe

Ann Radcliffe Quote – Poverty cannot deprive us of many consolations …

Be comforted, my dear sir; we shall not feel the want of those luxuries which others value so highly, since we never had a taste for them; and poverty cannot deprive us of many consolations.  It cannot rob us of the affection we have for each other, or degrade us in our own opinions, or in that of any person whose opinion we ought to value.

[...]

Besides, my dear sir, poverty cannot deprive us of intellectual delights.  It cannot deprive you of the comfort of affording me examples of fortitude and benevolence, nor me of the delight of consoling a beloved parent.  It cannot deaden our taste for the grand and the beautiful, nor deny us the means of indulging it; for the scenes of nature – those sublime spectacles, so infinitely superior to all artificial luxuries! are open for the enjoyment of the poor as well as of the rich.  Of what, then, have we to complain, so long as we are not in want of necessaries? pleasures, such as wealth cannot buy will still be ours.  We retain, then, the sublime luxuries of nature, and lose only the frivolous ones of art.

- Ann Radcliffe1

  1. The Mysteries of Udolpho, pg. 57 []

Ann Radcliffe

Ann Radcliffe Quote – Surely there is some magic in wealth …

Surely, said she, there is some magic in wealth, which can thus make persons pay their court to it, when it does not even benefit themselves.  How strange it is, that a fool or a knave, with riches, should be treated with more respect by the world, than a good or wise man in poverty!

- Ann Radcliffe1

  1. The Mysteries of Udolpho, pg. 127 []

Robert Pirsig

Robert M. Pirsig Quote – We do need a return to individual integrity …

My personal feeling is that this is how any further improvement of the world will be done: by individuals making Quality decisions and that’s all. God, I don’t want to have any more enthusiasm for big programs full of social planning for big masses of people that leave individual Quality out. These can be left alone for a while. There’s a place for them but they’ve got to be built on a foundation of Quality within the individuals involved. We’ve had that individual Quality in the past, exploited it as a natural resource without knowing it, and now it’s just about depleted. Everyone’s just about out of gumption. And I think it’s about time to return to the rebuilding of this American resource…individual worth. There are political reactionaries who’ve been saying something close to this for years. I’m not one of them, but to the extent they’re talking about real individual worth and not just an excuse for giving more money to the rich, they’re right. We do need a return to individual integrity, self-reliance and old-fashioned gumption. We really do.

- Robert M. Pirsig1

  1. From Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values (P.S.) []

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin Quote – I do not pretend to give …

To Benjamin Webb

A New Method of repaying Money lent.

Passy, 22 April 1784

Dear Sir,

I have received yours of the the 15th instant, and the memorial it enclosed. The account they give of your situation grieves me. I send you herewith a bill for ten louis d’ors. I do not pretend to give such a sum; I only lend it to you. When you shall return to your country with a good character, you cannot fail of getting into some business, that will in time enable you to pay all your debts. In that case, when you meet with another honest man in similar distress, you must pay me by lending this sum to him; enjoining him to discharge the debt by a like operation, when he shall be able, and shall meet with such another opportunity. I hope it may thus go through many hands, before it meets with a knave that will stop its progress. This is a trick of mine for doing a deal of good with a little money. I am not rich enough to afford much in good works, and so am obliged to be cunning and make the most of a little. With best wishes for the success of your memorial, and your future prosperity, I am, dear Sir, your most obedient servant,

B. Franklin.1

  1. The Works of Benjamin Franklin, pg. 82 []

Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand Quote – So you think that money is the root of all evil?

So you think that money is the root of all evil? Have you ever asked what is the root of money? Money is a tool of exchange, which can’t exist unless there are goods produced and men able to produce them. Money is the material shape of the principle that men who wish to deal with one another must deal by trade and give value for value. Money is not the tool of the moochers, who claim your product by tears or of the looters, who take it from you by force. Money is made possible only by the men who produce. Is this what you consider evil?

-Ayn Rand1

  1. Atlas Shrugged, pg. 405 []

Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson Quote – System

System

Every night my prayers I say,
And get my dinner every day;
And every day that I’ve been good,
I get an orange after food.

The child that is not clean and neat,
With lots of toys and things to eat,
He is a naughty child, I’m sure -
Or else his dear papa is poor.

- Robert Louis Stevenson1

  1. A Child’s Garden of Verses, pg. 29 []

Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell Quote – Autonomy, complexity, and a connection …

Autonomy, complexity, and a connection between effort and reward are, most people agree, the three qualities that work has to have if it is to be satisfying.

- Malcolm Gladwell1

  1. Outliers (2008), p. 149 via Fire and Knowledge []

Thomas Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes Quote – That man, which looks too far …

… so that man, which looks too far before him in the care of the future time, hath his heart all the day long gnawed on by fear of death, poverty or other calamity, and has no repose, nor pause of his anxiety, but in sleep.

- Thomas Hobbes1

  1. Leviathan, Or, The Matter, Form, and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil, pg. 57 []

Thomas Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes Quote – I merit by virtue of my own power …

He that performeth first in the case of a contract, is said to “merit” that which he is to receive by the performance of the other; and he hath it as “due.”  Also when a prize is propounded to many, which is to be given to him only that winneth; or money is thrown amongst many, to be enjoyed by them that catch it; though this be a free gift; yet so to win, or so to catch, is to “merit,” and to have it as”due.”  For the right is transferred in the propounding of the prize, and in throwing down the money; though it be not determined to whom, but by the event of the contention.  But there is between these two sorts of merit, this difference, that in contract, I merit by virtue of my own power, and the contractor’s need; but in this case of free gift, I am enabled to merit only by the benignity of the giver: in contract I merit at the contractor’s hand that he should depart with his right; in this case of gift, I merit not that the giver should part with his right; but that when he has parted with it, it should be mine, rather than another’s.

- Thomas Hobbes1

  1. Leviathan, Or, The Matter, Form, and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiastical and Civil, pg. 57 []

The Bible

Bible Quote – Matthew 6:24

No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.

- Matthew 6:24 (ESV)

No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth.

- Matthew 6:24 (NASB)

No one can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and Money.

- Matthew 6:24 (NIV)